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Fawn rescued in New Ipswich

  • A fawn was rescued by New Hampshire Fish and Game from River Road in New Ipswich after spending several days without its mother. Courtesy Photo 

  • A fawn was rescued by New Hampshire Fish and Game from River Road in New Ipswich after spending several days without its mother. —Courtesy photo

  • A fawn was rescued by New Hampshire Fish and Game from River Road in New Ipswich after spending several days without its mother. —Courtesy photo



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Tuesday, June 05, 2018

An abandoned fawn was recused by N.H. Fish and Game officers in New Ipswich Friday after motorists kept spotting it in the road.

Cindy Alzapiedi of New Ipswich was driving home from Manchester on Thursday when she first saw the fawn in River Road.

“I wasn’t even going to go home that way,” she said, but added divine intervention sent her a different route home that day. “It was just the right place at the right time. … I almost hit it.”

Alzapiedi pulled over and called the police to alert them of the fawn and was told that it was likely left there by its mother while she was foraging. Police advised her to leave the fawn alone.

Alzapiedi marked the spot where the fawn was hiding with some upright sticks and went home. 

“I was praying for the poor little thing all night,” she said.

She returned the next day to check on the fawn, and saw that a man had pulled over to check on the fawn as well. He had called Fish and Game to come check on the fawn, and was given the same advice as Alzapiedi: That the mother would likely come back for it. But as they stood on the side of the road, other drivers stopped to tell them that they had seen the same fawn in the area for several days in a row with no mother in sight.

Fish and Game responded Friday to check on the fawn.

“The officer determined that it appeared to be abandoned,” said Alzapiedi. “It was very thin.”

Fish and Game transported the fawn to a wildlife rehabilitator.  Fawns separated from their mothers rarely survive, Dan Bergeron, a deer biologist with Fish and Game, said Monday. 

“Our rehabber gets between maybe 15 and 20 fawns a year and may only ever release five or six,” said Bergeron. 

In this case, said Bergeron on Monday morning, the fawn appeared to be recovering.

“It’s not out of the woods yet, but it’s alive and doing pretty well right now, which our rehabber said is surprising given how long it was out there,” Bergeron said.

Most of the time the advice given to Alzapiedi is the correct course, he said.

According to Fish and Game, deer fawns are born in May and June and are often spotted and photographed alone. However, Fish and Game advise people to leave the fawns alone. A doe will leave its fawn for hours at a time to forge for food, but also as a way of protecting the fawn from predators.

Fawns are only between 4 and 10 pounds at birth and “are born with little scent and a spotted camouflage coat,” according to Fish and Game.

Because they are not very mobile they have a good chance of going noticed by predators when left by their mothers in high grass or thick vegetation. However, a doe may not return if there are people around or if people touch or pick up the fawn. 

“If a fawn looks healthy and it’s not crying, unless you know for certain that the mother has been hit by a car or something, most of the time the best thing is to leave them alone,” Bergeron said. 

If the fawn looks like it’s not doing well physically, or is constantly crying, he said, call Fish and Game’s Wildlife Division. The officers can assess the fawn and bring it to a rehabilitator if necessary.

For Fish and Game wildlife concerns call 603-271-2461.

 

Ashley Saari can be reached at 924-7172 ext. 244 or asaari@ledgertranscript.com. She’s on Twitter @AshleySaariMLT.