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Greenville

New traffic prompts Dunkin’ Donuts plan

  • The Greenville Planning Board did an overview of plans for a proposed Dunkin Donuts on Route 31 during their Thursday Meeting.<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Ashley Saari)
  • The Greenville Planning Board did an overview of plans for a proposed Dunkin Donuts on Route 31 during their Thursday Meeting.<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Ashley Saari)
  • The Greenville Planning Board did an overview of plans for a proposed Dunkin Donuts on Route 31 during their Thursday Meeting.<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Ashley Saari)

GREENVILLE — Construction of a new Dunkin’ Donuts store on Route 31 could begin as soon as the end of the month, following a public hearing on the proposed store.

“We hope to be pouring coffee by Columbus Day,” Joe Correia, who owns the property where the proposed store would be, told the Planning Board at Thursday’s meeting. Correia, along with Raymond Shea, the project manager, and Timothy Washburn of Ox-Bow Construction Company, met with the board Thursday for a preliminary review of the Dunkin’ Donuts plans, which would be built next to the Country Mile.

The proposal calls for a 2,020-square-foot, free-standing store, with a drive-through and 22 seats inside. It would use an existing driveway, but the pavement area would be extended to accommodate the new building.

In an interview following the review of the plans, Planning Board Chair Ted deWinter said the town has been pushing to attract industrial and commercial businesses to the area for the past 30 years. In fact, he said, Correia has been attempting to negotiate the addition of a Dunkin’ Donuts store for multiple years, but Route 31 has never been a large enough traffic generator to interest the franchise. But with businesses growing in the area, particularly the addition of a Heffner’s Service Station, Route 31 now has enough traffic to support a store.

“For years, we’ve been trying to attract businesses, because they attract assessment value, without attracting kids into the school district,” deWinter explained.

The proposed coffee shop wouldn’t generate much new traffic in the area, explained Shea, and traffic studies don’t indicate any need for a new turning lane. Most of the business would come from traffic traveling that route anyway.

One concern deWinter said is ensuring additional drainage to deal with the increase in water runoff that comes with paving. Shea assured the board that plans include additional drainage, and a detention area for excess runoff.

Prior to approval, the plans must also be OK’d by the town’s engineer, Chad Branon, of Fieldstone in Milford. The plans can be reviewed and approved by Branon prior to the public hearing, deWinter informed Correia.

The proposed business does not require any variances or special exceptions, deWinter said, and would be a straightforward use of the land. “Unless we have some movement in town or a really contentious public hearing, I would expect you to be in and out and approved that same day,” deWinter told Correia.

When asked, Shea told the board that the building would use public water and sewer, and would not include any baking on premises, but goods would be delivered.

The Planning Board will hold a public hearing on the proposal July 27 at 7 p.m. in the meeting room at the Town Hall.

Ashley Saari can be reached at 924-7172 ext. 244 or asaari@ledgertranscript.com. She’s on Twitter at @AshleySaari.

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