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Rindge

The stories behind a solemn reflection

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

    "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack. Purchase photo reprints at Photo Finder »

  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.
  • "Remember to Remember," an annual reading of the names of those who lost their lives of the terrorist attack of Sept. 11, 2001, gathered a small amount of residents at Cathedral of the Pines on the anniversary of the attack.

RINDGE — On Sept. 11, 2001, when nearly every eye in the nation was glued to a television screen, watching the horror of the World Trade Center attack, Lorraine Dellasanta was glued to the bedside of her son, who was in a hospital in critical condition. The TV wasn’t on, and she wasn’t in contact with the outside world. She didn’t find out about the terrorist attack until the day after the two planes collided with the Twin Towers, a third flew into the Pentagon, and a fourth went down en route to the White House.

“I never knew this happened, until afterwards,” Dellasanta of Jaffrey recalled softly, while sitting in the Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge on Wednesday as a recording read out the names of those who died that day, including passengers of the four flights, people in the Towers when they fell, and the rescue personnel who lost their lives in the aftermath. “I never saw it. I was never told. Now, I think I just want to honor those people.”

Every year, the Cathedral of the Pines has a reading of the names of those lost in the 9/11 attacks, in an event called “Remember to Remember.” Every year, a handful of residents turn out to listen to the recording. Some stay the whole time, and others just take a few moments of their day to sit and listen to a portion of the recording. The nearly 3,000 names take almost three hours to recite.

The recording was spearheaded by James Pelletier, 62, a Winchendon, Mass., resident. He’s organized a reading of the names on the anniversary of 9/11 since 2002, when he was still living in New York City. Now, he continues the legacy at the Cathedral of the Pines, where Wednesday he sat quietly, following the recording with a book about the victims. Originally, only the names of the New York City victims were read. Now, it’s expanded to include all the victims, including the flight passengers and crews and rescue personnel.

Pelletier worked with people at the World Trade Center multiple times when he was on Wall Street in the ’70s, he said in an interview at the Cathedral on Wednesday. Though he didn’t know anyone who died that day, he said he still felt a responsibility to the neighborhood. Especially as he had obtained a degree in psychology from Keene State College, and had previously worked with trauma victims.

“Because I knew the neighborhood so well, and had something to offer, it seemed natural to do something,” said Pelletier. “At the core of ‘Remember to Remember’ is the belief that dignity is more powerful than destruction. And that’s why we do this.”

This year, Pelletier also read aloud the names of some more recent victims: Those killed in the Boston Marathon bombings. Their names will be added in perpetuity to the event, said Pelletier. “Sept. 11 has become the equivalent of Memorial Day for citizens,” Pelletier noted. “Memorial Day is about recognizing our lost soldiers. This is a memorial day for American citizens. [The Boston Marathon victims] were killed by terrorists on American soil. They were citizens, non-military. They were innocent people.” Pelletier added that he would continue to add the names of any other victims who are killed on American soil by terrorist attacks.

Like Dellasanta, a few other residents turned out in quiet observance of the day. Linda Goddard of New Ipswich stopped by to listen. “I think we should remember 9/11,” she said. “We want to remember those that gave their lives.”

Peggy Basha of Rindge attended the event for the second year in a row to sit and listen. “I just want to remember all those people, and remember their lives,” she commented.

The New York Unit of the Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic recorded all the names of the New York City 9/11 victims. Actor Jerry Orbach read the New York Police Department officers names, actor Tom Christopher read the New York Fire Department firemen’s names, actress Betsy Palmer read the airlines victim’s names, and Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic volunteers read the names of the victims in the Twin Towers. In 2008, Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon volunteered to record the Pentagon victim’s names and Betsy Palmer read the names of the victims of Flight 77 and Flight 93. The recording of the victims’ names, as well as artwork for a poster and brochure is available to any legitimate organization that wishes to organize an annual reading, at no cost, said Pelletier. For more information, contact 212-592-9062 or Pelletier at 978-297-2427.

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