Peterborough

Horse sense

  • Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, left, introduces himself to Owen the horse, as Nathan Pimental, 7, and fellow classmates look on. Letting them breathe in your scent tells the animal that you are a fellow herdmate and not a predator. Both llamas and horses use smell as part of their social greeting structure. Horses and llamas typically greet each other nose-to-nose, each taking in the odor of the other. They will also greet humans in the same way.

    Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, left, introduces himself to Owen the horse, as Nathan Pimental, 7, and fellow classmates look on. Letting them breathe in your scent tells the animal that you are a fellow herdmate and not a predator. Both llamas and horses use smell as part of their social greeting structure. Horses and llamas typically greet each other nose-to-nose, each taking in the odor of the other. They will also greet humans in the same way.

  • Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, introduces himself to Youzer the llama.

    Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, introduces himself to Youzer the llama.

  • Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, left, introduces himself to Owen the horse, as Nathan Pimental, 7, and fellow classmates look on. Letting them breathe in your scent tells the animal that you are a fellow herdmate and not a predator. Both llamas and horses use smell as part of their social greeting structure. Horses and llamas typically greet each other nose-to-nose, each taking in the odor of the other. They will also greet humans in the same way.
  • Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, introduces himself to Youzer the llama.

Horse sense

Well School second grader Kaiden Bateman, 7, introduces himself to Owen the horse and Youzer the llama, as Nathan Pimental, 7, and fellow classmates look on. Letting them breathe in your scent tells the animal that you are a fellow herdmate and not a predator. Both llamas and horses use smell as part of their social greeting structure. Horses and llamas typically greet each other nose-to-nose, each taking in the odor of the other. They will also greet humans in the same way.

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