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Rindge

FPU professor is on a research  expedition in the Gulf of Alaska

Dr. Frank Hubacz, Jr., an environmental chemistry professor at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, embarked on a 12-day joint fisheries and oceanographic research cruise in the Gulf of Alaska to assist scientists on Monday.

Dr. Hubacz is participating in this study through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Teacher at Sea program, which bridges science and education through real-world research experiences. This year, NOAA – whose mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment – received applications from more than 250 teachers, and chose 25 to participate in research cruises.

Hubacz boarded the NOAA Ship Oscar Dyson in Seward, Alaska, and will assist scientists daily as they participate in the on-going Fisheries-Oceanographic Coordinated Investigation project.

“I am very excited to have been selected to participate in a current oceanic research project via the NOAA Teacher at Sea Program,” says Hubacz. “This hands-on experience will help me to better inform and excite students about the research and career opportunities available to them as it relates to the exploration of our world’s oceans.”

Hubacz is writing a
blog about his experience, accessible at: http://teacheratsea.noaa.gov/2013/hubacz.html.

“NOAA’s Teacher at Sea Program gives teachers the professional opportunity of a lifetime with a chance to participate in cutting edge science, on the ocean, working side-by-side with world-renowned scientists,” says Jennifer Hammond, the program’s director. “Teachers describe this authentic research experience as transformative and one that allows them to bring new knowledge and excitement back to their classrooms.”

Now in its 23rd year, the program has provided over 650 teachers the opportunity to gain first-hand experience participating in science at sea.

The educators chosen are able to enrich their curricula with the depth of understanding they gain by living and working side-by-side with scientists studying the marine environment.

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