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WLC: Students to take Chromebooks home

  • The Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative School Board recognized two Students of the Month at a school board meeting in the WLC library on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • The Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative School Board recognized two Students of the Month at a school board meeting in the WLC library on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Thursday, December 08, 2016

As the next step in Wilton-Lyndeborough’s one-to-one computing program, ninth graders will soon be able to take their school-issued Chromebooks home to work on assignments.

Currently, about half the students in the WLC district have access to a computing device that they use during the day, but students leave the device at school overnight.

The School Board met with Director of Technology Kevin Verratti to discuss potential issues with the concept, but Verratti was able to address their concerns, particularly on the matter of filters and controls on what the students were using the devices for.

Verratti explained that students would have the same filtering system as they do now, when they use Chromebooks in the classroom but leave them at school overnight. They have to use a student login to access the Internet on the Chromebooks, and the filter system is activated at that point. Students are prevented from loading new software onto their laptops, which prevents them from downloading an alternate browser to use.

Verratti explained that students activities are continually logged, and if a student is trying to “test” or try to get around the filtering system and access sites they know are not allowed, it can be taken up by the administration.

When asked about what occurs in the case of damages or loss, Verratti explained that the district is in the process of becoming certified Acer repair center, and would be doing any repairs needed in-house.

So far this year, there have been no instances of damage with the ninth grade class, said Verratti.

If the laptops are lost and stolen, the theft would be reported to the police, and the district would have records of all serial numbers if it was ever recovered.

When asked by School Board Vice Chair Harry Dailey if student’s understood the responsibilities of taking home the district’s equipment, Verratti explained that the district had had a sit-down meeting with the ninth grade to explain the expectations, and will be sending home a letter to parents outlining the responsibilities involved.

“I think it’s a better system than the current one,” said School Board member Matt Ballou. “They have some level of ownership.”

Verratti agreed, saying that students are likely to be careful with a piece of equipment they know they are solely responsible and have accountability for. “No one keys their own car,” he said.

Ashley Saari can be reached at 924-7172 ext. 244 or asaari@ledgertranscript.com. She’s on Twitter @AshleySaariMLT.