48th Dublin Gas Engine Meet continues through Sunday

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and ran through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

  • The 48th annual Dublin Gas Engine Meet opened Friday at Cricket Hill Farm in Dublin and runs through Sunday. Photo by ABBE HAMILTON—

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Published: 9/7/2019 10:06:23 AM

The grounds of the Dublin Gas Engine Meet were filled with the rhythmic chug of engines and the occasional backfire as vendors, exhibitors, and attendees trickled in on Friday afternoon for the long weekend event.

Single-cylinder internal combustion engines predate electricity. When they first appeared in the late 1800s, they became the preferred power source for powering pumps and geared machines as they were more portable than water wheels and faster to start up than steam engines, according to an enthusiastic parts vendor. Some of the machines on display were just powerful enough to pump water for a household well, or mill a family’s flour. Others were large enough to power a small machine shop. Caleb Niemala used one such engine to turn a lathe as he chiseled, sanded, waxed and polished pieces of fragrant pine into baseball bats.

George Heartman drove a 1935 Ford to the event from West Tisbury, Massachusetts. He said he’s only missed one year since his first Gas Engine Meet in 1983. He guided curious passersby through his collection of miniature steam-powered machines, some smaller than the dial on his watch. His display included devices of his own invention, including a USB charger and a tiny LED lamppost.

Some exhibitors puttered the grounds on riding mowers or mini bikes, slowing to catch up with old acquaintances, while others worked together to coerce uncooperative engines to life. One exhibitor had a crank-powered ice cream maker hooked up to a tractor. He said he and his 11-year-old son built the contraption themselves based on an idea they found on the internet and a smattering of parts they scrounged from friends.


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