Eat local a win-win for farmers and diners

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. Staff photo by Ashley Saari

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • Local farmers, restaurants and markets weigh in on the importance of sourcing foods locally. (Ashley Saari / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Ashley Saari—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

  • Carol Cersosimo makes pizza. Staff photo by Ashley Saari

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Published: 8/15/2016 6:24:42 PM

Translated into English, Fetta Di Casa’s name means “slice of home” – and that’s a motto they take seriously, said owner Carol Cersosimo.

Cersosimo makes brick oven pizza, mainly with ingredients picked fresh daily from her own cultivated gardens. She sources most of her meats locally from Fieldstone Farm. With few exceptions, most everything on her pizzas come from the area – even the wood used to heat her oven was cut on the lot where her food truck now has a permanent spot on Route 119.

“The freshest ingredients are picked right out of the ground,” said Cersosimo. “Usually what’s on your pizza has been picked and put on the pizza within the same day.”

It’s taking the idea of “eat local” and putting it into practice.

August is New Hampshire Eat Local Month, which encourages people to eat food grown and sourced within their own communities – whether by growing their own, visiting local farmers markets, and asking for local food options when you dine out.

There are plenty of benefits to the concept of “eat local.” 

One, said Harris Welden, the owner of Bantam Bar and Grill and Pearl Oyster Bar in Peterborough, is that the ingredients are just going to be better. 

“You can taste the difference,” said Welden. “The quality of the local products is just better.”

Welden said that much of his produce, as well as his meats, come from distributors that source locally. And while he said his first concern is quality, it’s icing on the cake that his purchases are supporting the local economy and local growers. 

“It’s a mutually beneficial relationship, for sure,” he said.

Peter Robinson, owner of Roy’s Market and Maggie’s Market Place in Peterborough, said there are a number of reasons he makes it a priority to buy products locally.

“One, it’s supporting the entire community. Two, it’s environmentally sound. And third, it’s because the product tends to be a lot fresher, so there’s a better nutritional value,” said Robinson. “I wish that I could do more with the local farms than I do. I’m not able to buy as much as I wish I could.”

Terra Fletcher, of Cloverly Farm in Greenfield, agreed, saying that a focus to buy and eat local is helping to keep farming alive in the region. Most of her income, she said, comes from the farm’s Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, business. CSAs are when a set customer base pays a farmer up front for a steady supply of produce throughout the growing season, which helps farmers to cover the start-up costs and tide them over during the early portion of the growing season.

“We rely on people making that idea of ‘eat local’ a fundamental part of their thinking,” she said. “Sometimes it’s been a struggle to convert people to the idea that this is better food and not that much more expensive.”

Plus, added Fletcher there is a clear economic benefit to giving your dollar to a local grower than to a big chain grocery.

“There is so much significance in keeping your dollars local instead of sending it to a big CEO. You’re supporting a local family, maybe even someone you know, who is then going to turn around and spend it locally,” she said.

“It’s the same dollars, if they can stay in the community and we keep circulating that same dollar, that’s critical,” agreed Nancy Adams, the owner of the Hancock Market. Adams  has owned the Market since 2011, and she said she buys as many local products as she can – from independent growers as well as wholesale producers like Tenney Farm in Antrim. She also gets her milk and meat from local farms, buys local maple syrup and honey, locally roasted coffee and baked goods from a local baker.

“It’s a win-win for all of us,” said Adams.

 

Ashley Saari can be reached at 924-7172 ext. 244 or asaari@ledgertranscript.com. She’s on Twitter @AshleySaariMLT. 


Jobs



Support Local Journalism

Subscribe to the Monadnock Ledger-Transcript, your source for Peterborough area news.


Monadnock Ledger-Transcript

20 Grove St.
Peterborough, NH 03458
603-924-7172

 

© 2021 Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy