×

Community Market is the place to be

  • Francestown girls Regan Kirlin, 9, and Demetra Law, 4, sell and drink lemonade at the Francestown Community Market Friday afternoon. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce

  • Alana Samuelson of Bennington and holds one-year-old Bodhi Galusha of Milford at the Francestown Community Market Friday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Tom Kirlin, John Law, Molly Cook and Kaela Law, with her daughter Demetra, talk and hangout at the Francestown Community Market Friday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce

  • Kaela Law and her four-year-old daughter Demetra, at the Francestown Community Market Friday.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Francestown residents Prescott Tolman, Rose Perry and Susan Cripps sell rhubarb, baked goods and succulent garden/bird feeder teacups at the Francestown Community Market Friday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Allie Hersey spins wool at the Francestown Community Market Friday while Francestown girls Emily Simard, 9, Regan Kirlin, 9, and Demetra Law, 4, ask her questions. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Allie Hersey spins wool at the Francestown Community Market Friday while Francestown girls Emily Simard, 9, Regan Kirlin, 9, and Demetra Law, 4, ask her questions. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Allie Hersey spins wool at the Francestown Community Market Friday while Francestown girls Emily Simard, 9, Regan Kirlin, 9, and Demetra Law, 4, ask her questions. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Tracey Rokes sells baked goods and plants at the Francestown Community Market Friday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Tuesday, June 12, 2018 9:13AM

The Francestown Community Market is quickly becoming the place to be for Francestown folk on a Friday evening.

The community market was started by Francestown Recreation Committee members Tom and Dawn Kirlin as a way to create a gathering space for residents following last summer’s closing of the Francestown Village Store.

“With the closing of the store everybody was sort of looking for a place to get together and do something,” Dawn Kirlin said. “Basically we wanted to give everybody a place to showcase things that are either made, grown or produced locally. … It gives people a place to meet and say hello and see their friends and neighbors and people they don’t get to see anymore.”

Kirlin sold her Pony Petals, lawn art made out of horseshoes, and fresh cut flowers at the market Friday. She also accepted donations and sold popcorn to raise money for the town recreation department.

“We’re basically using it as a fundraiser. This year we’re not charging a table fee,” she said. “We’ll let everybody come and see how it goes.”

The weekly Friday market runs 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the town horse sheds.

On Friday the sheds were filled with area residents selling wool, baked goods, plants, preserves and rhubarb.

“People make food, whatever they are good at,” Dawn Kirin said. “It’s nice because we have some people who already have a following and then we have people that have never done anything like this before.”

Susan Cripps of Francestown was selling her garden teacup creations that can be used as succulent gardens for bees and hummingbirds or as bird feeders before the bears come out of hibernation.

“It’s really wonderful. Getting to see a lot of people, meeting a lot of the vendors and it’s become quite a gathering spot on Friday afternoon for people,” Cripps said.

Molly Cook, who was hanging out at the market with friends while her two sons played with the other children said she misses the Francestown Village Store, “very, very much.”

“I’m not selling anything and this is my first day here and I think it’s great. I think it’s wonderful. I think it’s a great opportunity for the community to have a gathering place on a Friday night, Friday evening. It’s really exciting, and especially to see where it might go,” Cook said.

Cook said the community market is reminiscent to her of the town’s annual Labor Day celebration, but said most people are using it as a causal town gathering space that has been missing from the town since the Francestown Village Store closed last summer.

“I guess that this is kind of filling that void a little bit. That’s the kind of feeling that you get from people - - a place to exchange the weekly news and hangout,” Cook said. “Now it’s the community that gets to really reap the benefit. I think that’s great. Who knows what the summer will look like with produce from local farmers, who knows.”

B.J. Carbee, who was selling preserves with her husband Scott Carbee, said a market for the town has been a longtime coming. She said Francestown was one of the first towns to have a food co-op, but that died out about ten years ago.

“Longtime. We’ve been waiting for a long long time,” for the community market, Carbee said.

Carbee said when its available more local produce will be available at the market. “Right now there are a lot of rhubarb products because rhubarb is available.”

To join the market, message the Francestown Recreation Committee on Facebook, Kirlin said.