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House & Home: A Greenfield property with a stunning view

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, there’s a view of Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from the Timmons’ Greenfield property. Staff photos by Ben Conant

  • On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Published: 6/30/2020 11:37:17 AM

On any given day, if the weather is just right, Jesseca Timmons can see Mount Monadnock, North Pack, Crotched Mountain, Beech Hill and the steeple of the Dublin Community Church from her family’s Greenfield property.

Sometimes she forgets, being surrounded by it every day, just how impressive the views are from the 400-acre plot of land at the end of Woodland Hill Road that is part of 1,000 acres of conservation.

“Since COVID, it’s amazing how clear the air has been,” Timmons said. “I’ve seen houses I’ve never seen before.”

It is the only home on the dirt road that can get quite tricky in mud season. At one point, the road used to continue past the home that was built 200 years ago, and vehicles could drive all the way through to the area of Allrose Farm.

At one point, the home was made up of “a ton of tiny bedrooms,” Timmons said, as it was once used as the Greenfield Poor Farm. Her parents, Sara and Jeffry Timmons, purchased the home and property in 1994 and completely gutted it from the basement to the rafters to create their perfect getaway.

“But the house is still the original footprint,” she said. “She just had a vision of what she wanted.”

Her father always wanted a view and came across the property while looking at topographical maps for something within 75 miles of the family’s home in Harvard, Massachusetts.

For years, Timmons and her husband Abe would come during the summer with their two boys and eventually bought a small cabin one mile away that is part of the conservation area. But when Timmons’ father passed, it became too much for her mom, so 10 years ago they switched properties.

“I never expected to live here,” Timmons said.

She credits her parents with doing all the hard work of renovating and now she just has to “keep it standing.” And much of that credit goes to Abe, who is a master at snow removal and wood splitting. The two met in Colorado and considered staying there, but Timmons always wanted to come back to New England. Abe, who grew up in North Dakota, agreed and Timmons said she’s “lucky he loves living up here in the woods as much as I do!”

The roughly 3,000-square-foot home has four bedrooms, three of which are upstairs, and four bathrooms. The main bedroom features large windows that provide a view of Monadnock. The front part of the house boasts the original wide plank wood floors that on the lower floor is where the formal living room and library reside.

Just outside the living room is a large screened-in porch that was originally all open before her dad decided to section off an area for a comfortable gathering spot.

“He loved screened-in porches,” Timmons said.

The kitchen has hardwood cabinets – designed by Sara and constructed by Timmons’ grandfather and uncle – and an island that is great for preparing a meal and a casual bite to eat.

The Timmonses created a mud room off the dining area because it got to a point where they needed a concentrated space for all their stuff. The support beam in the middle of the house was bought by Abe in Iraq and is a discussion point whenever anyone sees it for the first time. And something that always catches the eyes of visitors is the many little lightning rods on the roof.

“People say we have the best-protected house,” Timmons said.

As you arrive at the house you’re greeted by the family’s three dogs and some quintessential New England themes. There’s a tire swing that hangs from one of the many sugar maples that surround the home.

What was once a connection from the house to the barn, was converted to a two car garage. The barn, which has a big sign that reads Woodland Hill Farm, is everything you’d think of when picturing a classic New England property surrounded by woods and meadows. It’s filled with all kinds of stuff accumulated over the years, including snowshoes and paddle boards, and anything else to enjoy the property and outdoor amenities the region has to offer.

The old pump house still stands across the driveway from the house, but is now only used to water the gardens. Sara spent a lot of time designing the garden areas that surround the house with flowers that bloom at all points of the year. Timmons has raised beds for vegetables and there are old cherry and apple trees that were strategically planted many years ago.

The view allows them to see town firework shows around the region during the summer months and even has a friend in Dublin that once waved something shiny to see just how good the view is.

“I just love being up in the woods and having the space and the quiet,” she said. “And it’s always nice to be reminded of it.”

Being at the end of a dirt road that used to continue and miles of trails, Timmons said “there’s just so many funny things that happen here.”

There was the group of motorcycle riders from Quebec, who only spoke French, that were looking for a motel. Turns out it was a camp owned by her parents in Maine that showed up online as being in Greenfield because that’s where the mail went. One day an elderly gentleman, who once drove the road many years before, was in the driveway wondering why it stopped.

“People end up here all the time,” Timmons said.

She sees mountain bikers go through her yard, lost hikers end up in her fields and gardens and has had bears on the front lawn.

“It’s really interesting up here,” Timmons said. “A lot of people use the land.”


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