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International artisans make stop at Mariposa

  • Nafisa Nazarov wears an embroidered robe she and her husband, Sanjar Nazarov, sell at a World Craft Fair in Peterborough this week.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Kathy Boss of Peterborough shops at a World Craft Fair in Peterborough Monday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Beth Draper of Nelson at a World Craft Fair in Peterborough Monday.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Peruvian art for sale at the Mariposa Museum during a World Craft Fair in Peterborough this week.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Peruvian art for sale at the Mariposa Museum during a World Craft Fair in Peterborough this week.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • The Mariposa Museum hosts a World Craft Fair in Peterborough July 24 and 25, 2018. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Eddie Gomez II of Peterborough and Jean Rosenthal of Hancock watch A. H. Mir at work during a World Craft Fair at the Mariposa Museum in Peterborough Monday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Nancy Roberts of Peterborough with Habibou Coulibay from Burkina Faso, who sells bags, clothing and jewelry at a World Craft Fair in Peterborough Monday night. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Jewelry made by artesians in Nepal on sale at the Mariposa Museum during a World Craft Fair Monday.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Patricia Garcia and Roberto Mejia sell traditional Mexican art during a World Craft Fair in Peterborough Monday.  Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—

  • Joy Flemming of Peterborough makes a find during a World Craft Fair in Peterborough Monday. Staff photo by Meghan Pierce—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Wednesday, July 25, 2018 6:32PM

A World Craft Market with artisans from Peru, Nepal, Uzbekistan, India, Burkina Faso, South Africa, Mexico and Madagascar filled the Mariposa Museum in Peterborough this week.

The market is about the survival of their cultures, many of the artisans said at a preview of the event Monday night. The event was also open to the public Tuesday and Wednesday.

“We do traditional embroidery. It’s all hand done, with a silk thread on a silk base,” Sanjar Nazarov of Uzbekistan said. “We are craftsmen. Everyone here came from their country. We are not living in the United States. … We want to show our craft in the United States. They have to know about our craft and Uzbekistan and what we do.”

More than 20 artisans from at least eight countries were at the fair with their hand-crafted wares to sell at retail and to wholesale customers.

Nazarov’s work includes bed spreads, sofa and cushion covers, clothes and shoes.

“This is given from generation to generation,” his wife Nasfisa Nazarov said of the craft.

A.H. Mir from India said his family cashmere embroidery craftsmanship is traced back 600 years to when the art came to India from Persia.

Ujjwal Shrestha from Nepal was selling crafts through his company Crafted in Kathmandu. The company sells work from various artisans. It’s a way to keep women living and raising their children in their home villages, where they can pass down the craft to their children. Without an income, the woman move away to find work and the culture and the crafts are lost forever lost.

Shrestha also said he works to create artisan craft work for women who have fallen into prostitution.

Kathy Boss of Peterborough attended Monday night’s preview of the fair and said she loved learning more about the cultures and stories behind each artisan. She also learned about the threats the cultures face, such as Crafted in Kathmandu and their effort to bring women out of the sex trade by creating work for them. 

“I just love seeing different cultures and seeing what they make and meeting people, so I came down to do that,” Boss said. “You also learn that we are all kind of the same.”

Like many at the event, she was impressed with the high level of craftsmanship. “Beautiful, beautiful artwork. And such care.”

The World Craft Fair has been traveling the country, where it is sometimes called a Culture Survival Bazaar. The fair was brought to the Mariposa Museum in collaboration with Cultural Survival Inc. and Joseph’s Coat. You can learn more about Cultural Survival Inc. at www.culturalsurvival.org.