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Town Meeting Primer 2018 - who’s running for office in your town?

  • Rindge residents went to Rindge Memorial School on Saturday, March 18, 2017 to vote. (Nicholas Handy / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Staff photo by Nicholas Handy


Thursday, March 08, 2018 4:17PM

Town Meeting Primer 2018 - who’s running for office in your town, what’s on the warrant, and where do you vote? Read on to find out.

Voting Times and LocationsAntrim

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m. – 7 p.m., Town Hall

Town Meeting: Thursday, March 15, Town Gym

Bennington

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Pierce School

Dublin

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Hall, upper floor

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m., Dublin Consolidated School

Greenfield

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Meeting House

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m., Meeting House

Greenville

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Greenville Elementary School building

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m., Greenville Elementary School building

Francestown

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Hall

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 10 a.m., Francestown Town Hall

Hancock

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Office.

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m. Meetinghouse

Jaffrey

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., VFW

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m., Conant High School gym

Lyndeborough

School District Meeting: Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m., Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative Middle/High School

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Citizens’ Hall

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 10 a.m., Citizens’ Hall

Mason

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Hall

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m., Mason Elementary School

New Ipswich

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Mascenic Regional High School

Peterborough

Voting (ConVal School District): Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Community Center

Rindge

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Rindge Memorial School

Temple

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Hall

Town Meeting: Saturday, March 17, 10 a.m., Temple Elementary School

Sharon

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Meeting House

Town Meeting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 p.m., Meeting House

Wilton

School District Meeting: Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m., Wilton-Lyndeborough Cooperative Middle/High School

Voting: Tuesday, March 13, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Town Hall

Town Meeting: Thursday, March 15, 7 p.m., Florence Rideout School

CANDIDATES RUNNING FOR OFFICE

 

*denotes the incumbent

ANTRIM

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Mike Genest*

Mike Genest currently serves as Antrim’s select board chair. Genest said he is running for the seat again because he said he really enjoys working with the people who make this town work.

Genes t said he’s been on the select board for the past 16 years and believes that the experience is beneficial to the board.

BENNINGTON

Select Board

Term length: three years

James Cleary*

James Cleary is currently serving on the select board. He is running for the position uncontested.

DUBLIN

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Walter Snitko*

Walter Snitko has served on the select board for the past three years and is currently the board’s chair. Prior to serving on the select board, Snitko spent time on the town’s budget committee and recreation committee. He has lived in town for more than 40 years. He is running unopposed for another three-year term.

Budget Committee

Term Length: two three-year seats

William B. Gurney*

Judith A. Knapp*

Budget Committee

Term Length: one year

Susanne Vogel

Cemetery Trustee

Term Length: three years

Brooks F. Johnson*

Planning Board

Term Length: two three-year seats

Bruce Simpson*

Steven A. Baldwin*

Planning Board

Term Length: one year

Allen Hearn

Trustee of the Trust Funds

Term Length: three years

Christopher J. Flynn*

FRANCESTOWN

Select Board

Term length: Three years

Brad Howell*

Brad Howell is currently serving on the select board. He is running uncontested.

GREENFIELD

Select Board

Term length: one seat, three years

Stephen M. Atherton Jr*

Stephen Atherton’s said he faced a number of obstacles, including personnel changes, major vehicle, and equipment purchases, taking steps to modernize town government and building Greenfield’s capital reserves by exercising good fiscal management. At the same time, Atherton said the board has worked to maintain transparency and have done our best to keep the tax rate manageable. He said despite the hours put in by the board, none of the things the board has accomplished in his tenure would be possible without the support of the townspeople and the cooperation of the town’s “first-rate department heads and employees.”

Karen Day

After a break of two years, Karen Day is running for the select board in Greenfield. Day is a New Hampshire native and has lived in Greenfield for 46 years. She has been involved in town government for about 19 years, having served on various committees including the budget committee, the conservation commission, and most importantly, the select board for nine years. Day currently serves as a deputy emergency management director and organizes the summer Music on the Common series of concerts.

“Serving on the select board was one of the toughest and – at times stressful – jobs I’ve ever had but one that was the most rewarding. Frankly, I miss the challenge of serving on the board, and I am ready to serve my community in this capacity once again,” Day said in a recent letter-to-the-editor.

Patricia L. LaPree

Patricia LaPree grew up in Temple and has lived in Greenfield since 2008. LaPree said she has worked for the town of Greenfield, at its recycling center and as a town welfare administrator.

“I have some acquaintance with the town governance,” she said.

LaPree currently works at the Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center in its rehab center. She also holds an associates degree in paralegal studies, which she said she can put to good use researching state statutes.

GREENVILLE

Select Board

Term length: three years

Michael Lamarre

Doughlas Reardon*

Select Board

Term length: one year

Margaret Bickford

Maggie Bickford has been on the Beautification Committee for four years, and has served on the Community Profile Project, as well as currently serving as a supervisor of the checklist. She has management, auditing and budgeting experience, and has provided oversight for quality of manufacturing and regulatory compliance as a quality manager for the Millipore Corporation.

Scott Tenney*

HANCOCK

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Isabel “Laurie” Bryan

Isabel “Laurie” Bryan has lived in Hancock for 33 years. She has served on the town’s Budget Advisory Committee, Planning and Zoning Boards, as a Library Trustee, and was a Select Board member from 1999 to 2005. Bryan retired as Executive Director of the Harris Center for Conservation Education. Bryan said raising her family, working in town, and serving on multiple boards has given her a “strong connection to and understanding of Hancock as a community.”

JAFFREY

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Bonnie Mitchell

Bonnie Mitchell is a former New Hampshire state representative, serving from 2004 to 2010. She also served as a supervisor of the checklist in town. She moved to Jaffrey from Manhattan, New York about 15 years ago and has a background in insurance.

“I want to be involved in town so I decided to run,” said Mitchell. “I’m a single woman living in a small New England town… I want to see how the town works.”

Library Trustee

Term Length: Two three-year seats

Pamela Armstrong*

Joseph Johnson

Trustee of the Trust Fund

Term Length: three years

Gary Arceci*

Moderator

Term Length: two years

Marc Tieger*

Supervisor of the Checklist

Term Length: three years

Eunice Jadlocki

LYNDEBOROUGH

Select Board

Term length: three years

Richard “Rick” McQuade

Select Board

Term length: Two years

Mark Chamberlain*

MASON

Select Board

Term length: three years

Charles Moser*

NEW IPSWICH

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Bernard “Bert” Hamill

Hamill holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering and an MBA and is a professional engineer and registered land surveyor. Hamill was elected to two terms on the New Ipswich Planning Board and served as chairman for the last two years.

David Lage*

David Lage is the incumbent Chair of the Select Board, also having served on the board from 2005-2008. His goal in running for the position a third time is to continually improve the town, while understanding the conservative values of the community. 

Select Board

Term length: one year

John Veeser*

RINDGE

Select Board

Term Length: three years

Tom Coneys

Tom Coneys is the owner of Disposable Medical Product Manufacturing Co., Self Storage Facility, and Residential Property Rentals. He has served on the planning board and is currently the chair of the budget advisory committee.

“I’m a conservative, but I’m more of a thinker and a researcher,” said Coneys. “I’m a jack of all trades.”

Roberta K. Oeser*

Roberta Oeser has served on the select board for the past six years. She has also served on the planning board and budget advisory committee. She is also currently involved with the Rindge 250 committee, which is organizing events to celebrate the town’s 250th anniversary.

“My goal and hope as your selectman is to be able to continue looking for ways to contain costs, keep the tax rate stable, find alternative sources of funding and most of all, make sure that the taxpayers receive the service not only required but expected by the people of Rindge,” said Oeser.

Moderator

Term Length: two years

Charlie Eicher*

Planning Board

Term Length: two three-year seats

John Anderson

Dennis Casey

Holly Koski

Jason Paolino*

Budget Advisory Committee

Term Length: two three-year seats

Cheryl R. McCabe Charron

David Graham

Philip Motta

Karl J. Pruter

Cemetery Trustee

Term Length: three years

William L. Harper*

Library Trustee

Term Length: two three-year seats

Roberta D. Gordenstein*

Craig Jensen

Karla J. MacLeod*

Trustee of the Trust Funds

Term Length: three years

J. Craig Clark Jr.

Supervisor of the Checklist

Term Length: six years

Lisa B. Wiley

Zoning Board

Term Length: two three-year seats

Janet C. Goodrich*

Philip Stenersen*

SHARON

Select Board

Term length: three years

Patrick Galbraith

Frederick Woodhouse III

TEMPLE

Select Board

Term length: three years

Ken Caisse*

Incumbent Ken Caisse is a small business owner in the town, Deputy Chief of the Temple Volunteer Fire Dept. and Rescue and Chairman of the Board of Directors at Monadnock Rod and Gun Club. He is the father of three grown children.

“I have no hidden agendas and welcome all viewpoints of all the residents of the small town of Temple,” said Caisse. “I support Agriculture, and all other business in town as well as our surrounding communities. I know what its like to live and work to pay my mortgage and bills and the struggles that go with that as well.

Bev Edwards

Lowering town taxes and homeowners’ costs through energy conservation are outgrowths of Edwards’ 10 years chairing the Temple Energy Committee. The $332,000 RGGI grant Temple won to conduct a deep energy efficiency municipal retrofit produced fuel reductions of 75 percent in the town’s Municipal Building/Fire Department and 30 percent in the library.

Planning Board

Term length: two three-year positions

John Kieley

Planning is Crucial to Temple’s Future. As a three-term member of the Select and Planning Boards, Kieley has worked with residents, town boards, State and Federal Officials/Committees to protect what Temple has, and plan for the future. Due to this collaborative work, Temple does not have massive wind towers or developments on its ridgelines, polluted aquifers, or a fracked gas compressor station next to the Temple Elementary School.

“Does Temple have challenges? Yes. I am known for preparing, attending, and actively participating at meetings. My efforts result in accomplishments. I can help the Planning Board protect Temple’s future. I would appreciate your vote,” said Kieley.

Bruce Kullgren Jr.*

Bruce Kullgren currently serves on the Planning Board.

Randall Martin

Randall Martin has 24 years of experience on the Planning Board, serving as recently as six years ago. He has served for seen years on the town’s Conservation Commission, and has served on the board of the board of the Nature Conservancy, where he helped preserve an additional 500 acres of Miller State Park. He has worked on the Temple Master Plan. He has lived in town since 1965, and has run the Timberdoodle Club for the past 30 years.

WILTON

Select Board

Term length: three years

Matthew Fish

Mary McDonough

Mary McDonough holds a B.S. in Science and a certificate in physical therapy and a master’s degree in administration. She has worked in healthcare in both a for-profit and nonprofit as an administrator. Most recently, she served as an administrator for Pine Hill School. She has lived in town since 1997, and she and her husband Steve have two daughters.

“I think it’s important to volunteer and give back to the community you live in, and I have the time to give towards at this point,” said McDonough.

CONVAL

School board – Bennington

Term length: one, three-year term

Keira Christian

“As an educator, I know the day-to-day life of a school,” Christian said. “I’ve seen many aspects, and understand how they work. I know the difference between what is nice to have and what is absolutely essential. As a homeowner and taxpayer, I want to keep our communities affordable and maintainable for the families who live here. I want them to be attractive to new families, and a safe place to raise children, run businesses and live out our lives. And as a parent I want our schools to continue to be reflective of our community values. I want our children to be respected and valued, and given what they need to become successful contributors to society.”

Linda Quintanilha*

Linda Quintanilha has served two, three-year terms on the school board. She said there are a number of reasons she wants to serve a third term on the ConVal school board. Quintanilha said she is proud of Conval, not just as a parent but as a 1987 alumni. She said she believes public education is a vital investment for the community, although it must be done with “fiscal responsibility and persistent oversight.” Quintanilha said she is running because too many children in schools have experienced “significant trauma” and need people on the front lines fighting for resources to help them.

School board – Greenfield

Term length: one, three-year term

Myron Steere III*

Myron Steere III is currently serving as chair of the school board.

School board – Peterborough

Term length: one, one-year term

Jerome Wilson

Term length: one three-year term

Janine Lesser*

Janine Lesser is currently serving on the school board. She is part of the budget and property, policy, and education sub-committees.

School board – Temple

Term length: one, three-year term

Niki A. McGettigan*

Niki McGettigan currently serves on the school board. She is part of the communication, budget and property, and negotiations subcommittees.

JAFFREY-RINDGE

School Board – Jaffrey

Term Length: three years

Laurel McKenzie*

Laurel McKenzie has served on the school board for the past three years, spending the past two years as chair. She also serves on Jaffrey’s planning board.

“I don’t think there’s a magic bullet… all I can do is continue to work with the board and committees,” said McKenzie, of needing to ensure the the two towns in the school district continue to work together. “We need to be in this together, the kids deserve it.”

School Board – Rindge

Term Length: three years

Heidi Graff

Heidi Graff previously taught Spanish to students of all grade levels in public schools in New York, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire, including Rindge Memorial School. In addition to teaching in the district, Graff’s three children have also attended schools in the district.

“I’m an involved parent,” said Graff, who said she has been to numerous school board meetings, open houses, plays, sporting events, and other events.

Alicia Stenersen

Alicia Stenersen is a preschool center director and educational specialist who has worked in Headstart programs through her career.

Stenersen has a five-year-old daughter in the district.

“I decided it was time for me to be involved,” said Stenersen. “I’m a parent, I want to represent the parent’s perspective.”

Moderator

Term Length: one year

Robert Schaumann*

MASCENIC

School Board – New Ipswich

Term Length: three years

Julie Lampinen

Julie Lampinen has volunteered at many capacities with with school district for near ly 20 years, serving as a room mother, a room mother coordinator, PTA president, a PTSO member, and more.

Lampinen has never held a public office, but has decided it’s time for her to take a turn to try and become involved with the school board.

“The district is currently doing a lot of community outreach, I feel that it’s important to bring the community in… all voices are important,” said Lampinen.

Jeffrey Salmonson*

Jeffrey Salmonson has served on the school board as a New Ipswich representative for the past six years and is currently the chair. He graduated from Mascenic High School in 1975 and has four grandchildren in the district. He has served on the school board as a New Ipswich representative for the past six years and is currently the chair.

“My goals as your school board representative are the same when I ran for the school board position six years ago; wisely spend our school tax dollars to control property tax increases, support policies promoting student learning and education, and performance accountability for Mascenic administrators and staff,” said Salmonson.

WILTON-LYNDEBOROUGH

School Board (Wilton)

Term length: two seats for three years

Cynthia Foss

Edwina Hastings

Edwina Hastings is currently serving on the School Budget Committee. She is most proud of the committee’s work to lower the school budget by 1.65 percent without having an impact on educational programs. She has lived in town for 25 years and has four children, two of whom went through the Wilton-Lyndeborough school system. In her private life, she worked as an emergency nurse for more than 30 years.

Jim Kofalt

“In 2007, our school property tax rate was $8.95 per thousand in Wilton,” Kofalt said. “Ten years later, it is $16.69 per thousand. That’s a compounded annual growth rate of over 6.4%, which is more than 3 times the rate of inflation during the same period. This trend is not sustainable.”

Carol LeBlanc*

Alex LoVerme*

LoVerme has served on the School Board for the past six years, and has experience on the Elementary School Budget Committee prior to the district consolidation. In his tenure, he has worked on contract negotiations with both teachers and support staff, and participated in both the principal search for the consolidated elementary school and superintendent search. He has three children currently in the WLC school system.

“I look at the big picture and I look at the bottom line,” said LoVerme. “I’m a taxpayer, and I don’t want my taxes to go up either, but we have to be willing to spend our money to give our kids a good education.”

ON THE WARRANT 

ANTRIM

Proposed budget: $4,131,420

Warrant articles: 

Article 5 — A yes vote would appropriate $100,000 for the replacement of Craig Road Bridge. The amount would come from the unassigned fund balance.

Article 8 — A yes vote would authorize the select board to enter into a five-year lease agreement for $30,000 for the purpose of leasing a truck for the Water & Sewer Department. All payments will be paid through the department’s budget with no amount to be raised by taxation. The warrant would also authorize the possible sale or trade-in of the current 2004 truck that will be sold with the proceeds to be put toward the lease. The agreement includes an escape clause. The select board recommends this article 2-1.

Article 14 — A yes vote would disband an Advisory Budget Committee that was established during the 2010 Town Meeting. The select board recommends this article 3-0.

BENNINGTON

Proposed budget: $1,729,235

Default budget: $1,712,824

Warrant articles: 

Article 15 – A yes vote would appropriate $37,000 for the Highway Heavy Equipment Capital Reserve Fund.  

Article 23 – A yes vote would appropriate $45,000 to provide additional Highway Department funds to address deferred road maintenance.

DUBLIN

Proposed budget: $1,928,652

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 5 – A yes vote on this article would raise $450,000 for road construction through a the issuance of bonds or notes, in a term payable over four years or less. All future payments would be taken from the road construction capital reserve fund. 

Article 6 – This year’s proposed budget is not recommended by the select board, as it doesn’t include $11,037 to increase the assistant to the town administrator’s position to full-time. The budget committee recommends the article. 

Articles 17 and 18 – A yes vote on both petition articles would give a 7.8-percent raise to the town clerk/tax collector and the deputy town clerk/tax collector. 

FRANCESTOWN

Proposed budget: $1,793,460

Warrant article of interest: 

Article 5 – A yes vote would appropriate $215,000 to complete town facility projects, including $170,000 for police station improvements, and $45,000 for Town Hall exterior painting and other improvements. The funds are slated to be pulled out of a Future Town Facilities Capital Reserve Fund. 

GREENFIELD

Proposed budget: $2,294,298

Warrant article of interest: 

Article 2 – A yes vote would appropriate the sum of $242,000, with $121,300 to be withdrawn for the fire rescue apparatus capital reserve fund and the remaining $120,700 to be payable over the term of five years, beginning in 2019, with an annual appropriation of $27,000. In each of the following five years, the appropriation of $27,000 will be included in the operating budget. This article has no effect on taxation in 2018. The select board does not recommend this article in a 2-1 vote. 

GREENVILLE

Proposed budget: $2,141,890

Warrant articles of interest:

Articles 4 and 5: Yes votes on these articles raise funds for the operation of the water and wastewater departments: $392,401 for the wastewater and $277,199 for the water department.

Article 11: A yes vote on this article will raise an appropriate $162,000 for the purchase of a loader for the Highway Department, with $17,000 to come from trade-in value of the previous loader, $29,000 to come from expendable trusts, $6,000 to come from Public Works Equipment reserve, $5,000 to come from water revenues, $5,000 to come from wastewater revenues and $82,700 to be bonded.

Article 12 — A yes vote will raise $33,500 for high-band radio communications for the Fire Department.

HANCOCK

Proposed budget: $2,322,560

Article 2 – A yes vote would appropriate the sum of $512,246 to replace the fire department apparatus 1996 fire engine with a new engine and equipment. It also authorizes the issuance of $512,246 of bonds or notes in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act. 

Article 4 – A yes vote would appropriate the sum of $121,452 for the purpose of repairs to Longview Bridge and authorize the withdrawal of $75,000 from the Bridge Capital Reserve Fund created for that purpose. The balance of $40,000 is to come from NH LCHIP grant and $20,000 from a pledged grant from the Hancock Improvement Association. No money shall be expended unless the grant funds are secured. 

JAFFREY

Proposed budget: $6,521,081

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 3 – A yes vote will allow the operation of keno games within town at businesses with valid pouring licenses. 

Article 4 – A yes vote would give the select board authority to utilize scale and disposal services from outside sources for the disposition of construction and demolition waste. 

Article 6 – A yes vote would prepay $600,424 in debt incurred by the Squantum Road well project and the fire truck capital lease. Debt will be paid by up to $318,812 from te water restricted fund and up to $281,612 for the general fund unassigned fund balance. 

LYNDEBOROUGH

Proposed budget: $2,042,032

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 7 – A yes vote will expend $41,000 for the purchase of a new police vehicle, with $21,000 from taxation and $20,000 raised in 2016.

Article 8 – A yes vote will raise $220,000 to purchase a Highway Department dump truck, with $171,000 from capital reserve and $49,000 from general taxation.

Article 11 – A yes vote will raise and appropriate $22,000 to pave the eastern side of the Citizens Hall parking lot.

MASON

Proposed budget: $1,684,631

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 6 – A yes vote will raise $50,000 to repair and maintain town roads.

Article 7 – A yes vote will raise $54,000 to purchase a police cruiser, with $28,000 from capital reserve and $26,000 from taxation.

Article 9 – A yes vote will raise $39,000 to upgrade the Fire Department communication system.

NEW IPSWICH

Proposed budget: $2,350,650

Default budget: $2,309,472

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 5 and 6 – Yes votes on these articles will raise a total of $600,000 for road maintenance. Article 5 would raise $350,000 and article 6 raises $250,000.

Article 10 – A yes vote will expend $415,000 from capital reserves to replace the Fire Department pumper.

Article 16 – A yes vote will raise and appropriate $685,000 for the future replacement of the Taylor Road bridge. The town anticipates $548,000 to be reimbursed from the state bridge aid program.

RINDGE

Proposed budget: $3,978,624

Default budget: $3,961,611

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 5 – A yes vote will purchase a new fire engine for the town for $450,000. The engine will be paid for by up to a five-year lease/purchase agreement. The agreement has an escape clause. The cost includes engine detailing, lender legal fees, and will be offset by a $10,000 trade-in of the old engine. 

Article 11 – A yes vote will raise $206,000 to purchase a three and a half yard, rubber tire bucket loader with attachments, using $166,000 from the unassigned fund balance and $40,000 from the transfer station special revenue fund. The funds will also be offset by approximately $30,000 by trading in the town’s 1998 Cat loader. 

Article 17 – A yes vote will raise $100,000 for the highway capital reserve fund and $25,000 fire department capital reserve fund. 

SHARON

Proposed budget: $376,425

Article 6 — A yes vote would raise $10,000 for the town bridge fund.

Article 9 — A yes vote would raise $35,000 to be placed in the town highway repairs fund.

Article 10— A yes vote would discontinue the entire length of Swamp Road and allow the road to be barred to traffic other than road residents or landowners.

TEMPLE

Proposed budget: $1,315,165

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 2— A yes vote on this ballot article will abolish the town meeting system in favor of official ballot voting on all issues, known as SB2. It requires a 3/5 majority to pass.

Article 5— A yes vote will make the office of highway agent appointed, instead of elected.

Article 6— A yes vote will raise $20,000 for the highway vehicle and equipment capital reserve. 

WILTON

Proposed budget: $5,278,969

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 11— A yes vote will raise $20,000 for the purpose of developing the New Reservoir as a public recreational area.

Article 15 — A yes vote will allow the Selectmen to enter a seven-year lease agreement for a new dump truck, cost totaling $220,000, and raise $35,000 for the first year’s payment. 

Article 18 — A yes vote would authorize the Selectmen to enter a seven-year lease to purchase a new ambulance, for a total amount of $222,763 and a raise a first year’s payment of $31,824.

CONVAL

Proposed budget: $45,589,763 

Default budget: $44,934,209

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 1 – A yes vote means that two additional science classroom spaces will be renovated at the same time during summer 2018. The district would appropriate $1 million for the project. A no vote would mean the same two labs would have to be renovated at a later date.

Article 3 – A yes vote would adopt a third party factfinding report that benefits ConVal employees. The vote comes with a $1,685,912 price tag. A no vote means there will be no changes to the collective bargaining agreement, including no increases in wages or salaries for the 2018-19 school year.

Article 10 – A yes vote means that if the school board subsequently approves this amendment, the board will be granted the discretion to close schools that fall below 50 students.

JAFFREY-RINDGE

Proposed budget: $25,385,854

Default budget: $25,851,720

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 5 — A yes vote would change the district’s apportionment formula by removing the property valuation from the formula. Currently, the formula is a 50-50 blend of property valuation and average student count. If passed, the change would be phased in over six years.

Article 7 – A yes vote would raise up to $150,000 for the district’s building maintenance capital reserve fund.

Article 9 – A yes vote would reduce the vote required to change the articles of agreement from two-thirds to three-fifths. 

MASCENIC

Proposed budget: $19,211,637

Default budget: $18,874,705

Warrant articles of interest:

Article 3 – A yes vote will would establish a healthcare capital reserve account to cover the cost of health insurance and related costs for district employees. The article would also raise $1,000 from the district’s June 30, 2018 fund balance to be placed into the fund. 

Article 4 – A yes vote would raise up to $75,000 to be added to the school repair and maintenance capital reserve fund, with funds coming from the district’s June 30, 2018 fund balance. 

MASON SCHOOL DISTRICT

Proposed budget: $3,179,717

Default budget: $3,084,550

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 4— A yes vote will raise and appropriate $20,000 for the educating educationally disabled children capital reserve. These funds will come from the unreserved fund balance, not taxation.

Article 5— A yes vote will raise $5,000 for the school building and grounds maintenance capital reserve fund. The amount will be raised from unreserved fund balance and not taxation. 

WILTON-LYNDEBOROUGH

Proposed budget: $12,344,685

Warrant articles of interest: 

Article 5 — A yes vote would approve a collective bargaining agreement between the district and the Support Staff Association, which would include $6,575 in increases for the current fiscal year, $16,523 for the 2019-20 year and $16,601 for the 2020-21 year.

Article 7 — A yes vote would raise $117,745 to implement a full-day Kindergarten program. The cost would be offset in part by revenue from the state.

Article 8 — A yes vote would raise $60,000 to be added to the cooperative building/equipment and roadway capital reserve fund.