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Peterborough Women’s March draws hundreds downtown

  • Locals gathered at the Peterborough Town House on Sunday, the anniversary of last year's women's march on Washington, D.C. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Locals gathered at the Peterborough Town House on Sunday, the anniversary of last year's women's march on Washington, D.C. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Locals gathered at the Peterborough Town House on Sunday, the anniversary of last year's women's march on Washington, D.C. Staff photo by Ben ConanT

  • Locals gathered at the Peterborough Town House on Sunday, the anniversary of last year's women's march on Washington, D.C. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Locals gathered at the Peterborough Town House on Sunday, the anniversary of last year's women's march on Washington, D.C. Staff photo by Ben Conant—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Monday, January 22, 2018 5:40PM

A rally in Peterborough drew hundreds to the steps of the Town Hall on Sunday afternoon.

The rally marked the one-year anniversary of a Women’s March, which drew millions into the streets in cities across the country a day after Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th U.S. president last year.

On Sunday, people donned the same pink hats that became synonymous with the event last year, held posters scrawled with similar messages, and cried out now-familiar chants.

The rally is a backlash to comments from the White House, which many have interpreted as hateful to certain segments of the population.

Clare Deucher traveled from her home in Ashburn, Mass. to march in Peterborough on Sunday afternoon. Deucher said she marched in Cambridge the day before.

“I’m so disgusted by the administration,” Deucher said as she marched down School Street holding a colorfully striped flag that waved in the wind. “It’s ripping the national identity from this country.”

Deucher said she’s been disgusted since Trump launched his campaign for president.

“He said Mexicans are rapists,” Deucher said recalling a speech Trump gave on the campaign trail in 2016. “I have more in common with my brown-skinned neighbors than I have with rich, white, privileged people.”

On Sunday, she said it was exactly a year ago that she traveled to Washington D.C. to the Women’s March held the day after Trump’s inauguration. Deucher said every day since the current administration took office she had performed some sort of political action whether it has been sending an email, making a phone call, or contributing to a political organization.

Deucher said she’s always been political, but “never this active.”

“It was never a daily thing,” Deucher said.

Laura Lynch, who lives in Temple, shared a similar sentiment. She had been spurred to action before, most notably when a natural gas pipeline proposal would have cut through several small towns in the Monadnock region.

But since Trump was elected, Lynch has run for a state House of Representatives seat, which she was unable to clinch. More recently she spearheaded the organization of the Women’s March in Concord on Saturday that drew more than 1,000 people, according to an Associated Press article.

As Lynch stood on Grove Street in Peterborough on Sunday afternoon, a driver in a burnt orange car drove by chanting “build the wall, build the wall, build the wall” in reference to Trump’s campaign promise to build a dividing wall along the border of the United States and Mexico.

Lynch mumbled “what an idiot” as the man drove by.

After the man was out of sight, Lynch launched into a plan about what needs to be done in order to change the current political climate.

“I’m really focusing on getting people out to vote because sometimes voting can be intimidating, to get women to run for office,” Lynch said.  “Those are my goals.”