9/11 remembered in Rindge Wednesday with the reading of victim’s names

  • Ira Hoffman, an honorary assistant chief with the New York Fire Department, attended the Remember to Remember observance of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks held at the Cathedral of the Pines on Wednesday morning.  Staff photo by Ashley Saari

  • Emily Ouellette of New Ipswich and her son Adrien Ouellette, look at a book with portraits of victims of the 9/11 attacks during a reading of the victim’s names at the Cathedral Pines in Rindge on Wednesday morning.  Staff photo by Ashley Saari—

  • Staff photo by Ashley Saari

  • Giuliana Urato, 3, of Gardner, Massachusetts plays quietly with her father’s phone while the names of victims of Sept. 11, 2001 are read during the annual Remember to Remember observance at the Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge Wednesday morning. Her father, Joshua Urato, is a member of the Ashburnham Fire Department. Staff photo by Ashley Saari

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Published: 9/11/2019 2:01:12 PM

Each year, on Sept. 11, Rindge remembers those who have fallen in domestic terrorist attacks, by listening to a reading of their names.

The tradition, held annually at the Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge, was started by James Pelletier of Winchendon, Massachusetts. It started with a reading of the 2,997 names of those killed in the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. It has since grown to include other incidents, including the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting, the 2017 New York City truck attack, and the Boston Marathon bombing.

The ceremony begins each year at 8:45 a.m., the same time as the start of the Sept. 11 attacks.

Ira Hoffman, an honorary assistant chief at the New York Fire Department, attended the ceremony this year, as well as in 2018.

He said the impact of the Sept. 11 attacks is still vividly felt by the department.

Only a week ago, the most recent graduating class of probationary firefighters had 13 members whose parents were killed in the World Trade Center attacks – 12 who were firefighters, and one who was a police officer.

“They are all very aware of the risks of their profession because they’ve lost a parent. And they’re there anyway,” Hoffman said.

The full reading takes more than three hours, and often people come and sit quietly for a short portion of that time.

“It’s heartening to see people who were 200 miles away from where this happened felt moved to organize this,” Hoffman said. “And that people take the time to come and listen for a while.”

Available at the Cathedral of the Pines during the observance were books with photographs and biographies of those killed in the 9/11 attacks, and memorials to first responders killed.

“It means something when you hear the names or see the photos. They’re not just a statistic. They’re people who went to work that day and didn’t know they weren’t going home,” Hoffman said.


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