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Lest we forget: Dublin exhibit remembers WWI 

  • Lucy Shonk puts the finishing touches on her grandfather Herbert Shonk’s World War I uniform, on display at the Dublin Town Hall. Herbert’s son Peter Shonk was born two months after Herbert was deployed to France, and he did not meet his son until he returned. Peter would go on to fight in World War II. Herbert’s other son, Bronson, also fought in WWII and was killed in action, before meeting his own son, also named Bronson.  Staff photo by Ben Conant

  • An exhibit honoring Dublin's contributions to World War I opens Saturday at the town hall. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • An exhibit honoring Dublin's contributions to World War I opens Saturday at the town hall. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • An exhibit honoring Dublin's contributions to World War I opens Saturday at the town hall. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • An exhibit honoring Dublin's contributions to World War I opens Saturday at the town hall. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • The Dublin Historical Society is hosting a temporary exhibit "Lest We Forget: Dublin's Patriots in WWI" in the top floor of the town hall. The exhibit showcases Dublin's role in World War I. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • The Dublin Historical Society is hosting a temporary exhibit "Lest We Forget: Dublin's Patriots in WWI" in the top floor of the town hall. The exhibit showcases Dublin's role in World War I. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • The Dublin Historical Society is hosting a temporary exhibit "Lest We Forget: Dublin's Patriots in WWI" in the top floor of the town hall. The exhibit showcases Dublin's role in World War I. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Thursday, August 09, 2018 9:55AM

On the heels of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, a temporary exhibit will showcase Dublin’s involvement in the Great War.

At least 25 people in town were involved in the war efforts, said Dublin Historical Society volunteer Celeste Snitko.

Soldiers remembered in the exhibit include Richard C. Meryman, who worked in army’s camouflage division during the war. Before the war he had been an assistant to Abbott H. Thayer, another Dublin resident whose artistic research on concealing coloration may have had an effect on World War I era camouflage.

“I wish Thayer could see it all,” Meryman said in a letter to h is mother dated Sept. 16, 1917. “After having devoted so many years of his life to this very thing and all the time receiving almost no encouragement from the government and from scientists, suddenly through great necessity the whole thing crystalised [sic] into an actuality. He would be so pleased to see it working.”

Almerin M. Gowing, who served in the photo department of the signal corps, is also featured in the exhibit.

“Lest We Forget: Dublin’s Patriots in World War I” opens in the top floor of the town hall Saturday, Aug. 11, and will remain open every day from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. until Aug. 26. The exhibit will also be open from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Mondays.

“War is a terrible thing, lest we forget,” Lucy Shonk said.

Shonk’s grandfather, Herbert Bronson Shonk’s World War I uniform is one of the items on display. Herbert Bronson Shonk was deployed two months before the birth of his son, Peter Marne Shonk. He was actually at the Battle of Marne, hence Peter’s middle name, at the time of his son’s birth and he would not meet him until he returned from the war.

Peter and his brother, also named Herbert Bronson, would go on to fight in World War II. Herbert Bronson, who fought in WWII, also had a son born while he was deployed; tragically, the son would never know his father, as he was killed in a training exercise before returning home.

An opening reception will be held on Monday, Aug. 13 at 5:30 p.m.

Approximately 60-percent of the exhibit is items donated to the Dublin Historical Society, Snitko said, with the remaining items donated for the exhibit.

Snitko said the exhibit was inspired by other exhibits she had seen throughout the state.

“We knew we had a lot of good artifacts… we felt like the time was right,” Snitko said.

Much of the information the historical society has on Dublin residents involved in the war was pulled from a town history book.

Snitko said more is known about residents like Meryman, as their families have donated records.

The exhibit will feature uniforms, newspaper clippings, photographs (many of which were donated by Almerin M. Gowing), memorabilia, and other artifacts from the war. Snitko said people will be free to read newspaper articles and other documents.

There are also posters highlighting information known about each of the enlisted Dublin residents.

“We have a lot of tie-ins to the war,” Snitko said.

Nicholas Handy can be reached at 924-7172 ext. 235 or nhandy@ledgertranscript.com. He is also on Twitter @nhandyMLT.