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Cards for Kids

  • Reagan Riffle Photo by Daisy Young—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript Intern
Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:59PM

Family and friends are gathering as the holiday season sneaks up on us. We look forward to the food, presents, and laughter - but most importantly the spirit of giving. Reagan Riffle, 16, of Peterborough, certainly hasn’t forgotten about giving during this holiday season.

Every year, there are rehab, maternity, surgery, and emergency care departments patients who must spend the duration of their holidays in a hospital room. This can be lonely, but organizations like Cards for Kids can help defeat those holiday blues.

Cards for Kids is a national organization that provides hopeful messages to sick children in hospitals. However, Riffle says that this organization is “need-based” and “not personal.”

Riffle is aiming to pair ConVal student’s and other members of the community with patients at Monadnock Community Hospital.

“I hope for this version of the organization to be more community focused and targeted at a more widespread community of patients in need,” Riffle said.

Riffle will be collecting the letters through meetings and letter drives with the volunteer writers.

“There is more to discuss over who exactly will be receiving letters and whether or not their names will be signed, but I hope to see this project expand as years go on,” Riffle said.

Riffle says she has had help from Hannah Ladeau, who works at Monadnock Community Hospital in the Bond Wellness Center.

“Hannah has been beyond helpful by talking the project through with me and getting me in contact with more people inside of MCH to talk about the potential of this project.”

Aside from Ladeau, she thanks the many volunteers who have agreed to help with the project. She hopes to see this project expand even greater throughout many years.

Riffle’s inspiration to do this project came from her own experiences at Monadnock. She had a sports related injury last year, and had to spend many of her summer mornings and afternoons at the Bond Wellness Center.

“While I still had a team and a supportive group of friends and family, the visits became very lonely and my attitude became very hopeless,” Riffle said.

She imagined this experience was similar and worse for the patients of Monadnock. Her goal is to make the patients feel “loved, cared for, and not forgotten.”