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Parents get online safety advice

  • Keene High School Student Resource Officer James Lamoureux came to Jaffrey-Rindge Middle School on Saturday for a presentation on Internet Safety. April 30, 2016. (Nicholas Handy / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Nicholas Handy—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript...

  • Keene High School Student Resource Officer James Lamoureux came to Jaffrey-Rindge Middle School on Saturday for a presentation on Internet Safety. April 30, 2016. (Nicholas Handy / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Nicholas Handy—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript...

  • Keene High School Student Resource Officer James Lamoureux came to Jaffrey-Rindge Middle School on Saturday for a presentation on Internet Safety. April 30, 2016. (Nicholas Handy / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript) Nicholas Handy—Monadnock Ledger-Transcript...



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Monday, May 02, 2016

James Lamoureux did not mince his words Saturday: there is no way to stop today’s youth from accessing the Internet.

Lamoureux, a student resource officer at Keene High School, came to Jaffrey-Rindge Middle School for a J-R Alive sponsored presentation about Internet safety, talking about how to overcome the dangers of the World Wide Web.

“We can’t kid ourselves as parents,” said Lamoureux, who has a five-year-old at home. “There is no way to watch our children and what they are doing online all of the time. They can access Internet on their phones, their laptops, and their gaming devices. And with Internet cafes and places like McDonalds offering free Internet, it becomes even harder to monitor.”

Lamoureux advised parents to be mindful of how their children use the Internet, as there is always a new app or way that they can be speaking with strangers.

“Predators use information against children to gain their trust,” said Lamoureux. “And everyone is vulnerable, including you and me.”Lamoureux also said it was important for parents to talk with children about the potential dangers, rather than threatening them. Lamoureux said the best thing a parent could do in the Internet age is to build up trust so children feel comfortable talking if something goes wrong.

“Children are curious,” said Lamoureux. “If you tell them not to do something, they will just further hide what they are doing. You want to instill caution when using the Internet, not use scare tactics.”