×

Trump card

Peterborough man to take his Trump impersonation to Boston-area Nov. 3

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Comedian Eric Jackman, pictured in his Peterborough kitchen, plans to take his Trump shtick to the Boston area next month to headline a comedy show. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas HandY

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—

  • Peterborough comedian Eric Jackman will bring his Donald Trump impersonation to Somerville, Massachusetts on Nov. 3 for his first headlining show in the Boston area. This time around, Jackman will bring his twin brother Mike along, who will be impersonating Alex Jones and Michael Moore. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Wednesday, October 17, 2018 6:27PM

In the bedroom closet of Eric Jackman’s Peterborough apartment resides a blonde wig with an distinctly iconic swoop and a red power tie.

Akin to Batman donning his famous cape and cowl, 32-year-old Jackman becomes a man transformed when he slips on his Donald Trump-inspired get up. When the face bronzer goes on, the embodiment of Trump – down to the pursed lips and signature hand gestures – comes out.

“It’s like Jim Carrey’s ‘The Mask.’ If you are just holding the mask and it’s not attached to something it doesn’t have any power,” Jackman said, referring to the 1994 dark fantasy comedy film based on a comic series of the same name. In the film, Carrey plays a timid bank clerk who discovers a mask that turns him into a green-faced super hero with a mischievous streak.

“As soon as the wig goes on, it comes to life and you become the monster.”

The comedian and self-proclaimed political junkie – he has a political science degree from Franklin Pierce University and ran for state rep. in Cheshire County as a “Liberty Republican” in 2012 – has been impersonating the nation’s president since a 2006 feud between “The Donald” and actress/comedian Rosie O’Donnell.

It wan’t until Trump began to run for office, however, that Jackman decided to try his hand at turning his impression into a profession.

“It’s been awesome, it’s been amazing. I don’t know how long it’s going to go on for,” said Jackman, who currently gets at least one paying gig a month throughout the United States.

“As long as there’s a demand for it, I’m going to keep doing it. As long as there’s a market for it and it’s relevant, I’m going to continue to be that product.”

Some of Jackman’s most notable accomplishments thus far include being listed as one of 18 top Trump impersonators by CBS – sharing the list with the likes of actor Alec Baldwin – starring as Trump in a independent film directed by Lloyd Kaufman, and being pointed out personally by Trump during his rally in Manchester on the night before the primary.

“It was fun for me, I enjoy doing it. And you already have a built-in audience right there,” Jackman said, of the rally. “Whether it’s people who love him or hate him or are indifferent, I can come up with something that will entertain them, make them laugh, and make them think. That’s a big part of my routine, to use the Trump character as a means of putting out a bigger message.”

On Nov. 3, Jackman will headline one of his most “bigly” shows to date – his Boston-area debut – at The Rockwell in Somerville, Massachusetts.

“A lot of my stuff is direct quotes from Trump himself. I just read as much as I can about Trump and I memorize crazy [things] that he said and I just take it, and I really don’t need to add that much to it, I just put it out there and use it for a funny scenario,” Jackman said. “And people go, did he really say that, or did Eric make that up? That’s when you know it’s good – when it’s not clear if Trump said it, or if it’s just a concoction you dreamt up. And it’s getting so ridiculous that the line doesn’t really exist anymore.”

Normally more of a one-man show, Jackman will bring along twin brother, collaborator, and material co-writer Mike Jackman, who will host “President Trump’s State of Disunion” and bring to life two of his own characters: radio host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and documentary filmmaker Michael Moore.

“We play to our strengths,” Mike said. “Eric has the Trump thing, which is first and foremost and the big focus. He usually just performs by himself, but we want to have this be a little more theatrical.”

Eric and Mike have long been comedians and impressionists, dating back to their K-12 days in the Jaffrey-Rindge School District. Family members, friends, teachers, politicians, and celebrities all became a part of the Jackmans’ satire.

“We were like 12 years old, it was ridiculous,” Mike said, referring to a seventh grade skit where he gave a farewell address as former President Bill Clinton. Eric played the part of Linda Tripp, who played a key role in the Clinton/Monica Lewinsky scandal by recording private phone calls between the two.

The Jackmans often launch into various political and pop culture impressions when they are in the same room together, and rehearse much of their material in their kitchen.

“I can never turn [the Trump voice] off. I have dreams about the guy. He’s the wind beneath my wings,” Jackman said. “Do I have dreams or nightmares? Maybe both. It’s a character that has worldwide recognition that I’m now known for and connected with for the rest of my life. It’s a weird thing, but I’m going to role with it.”

While it may seem easy to put on a wig and regurgitate some of Trump’s “greatest hits,” Jackman said his portrayal has become a huge character study into Trump’s psyche.

“You gotta go pretty deep with Trump,” Jackman said. “I mean it helps to have a historical baseline for the world he came from, and you can get that from any number of sources.”

Many hours are spent reading articles and watching documentaries about Trump, writing and rehearsing material, and of course, watching his Twitter feed.

“Normally you can’t be blunt like that, you can’t talk like that, but Trump has always been that way,” Jackman said. “… It gives you the freedom to connect to some really funny things and put it into a hilarious joke.”

When it comes to politics nothing is blue or red for the Jackmans. Both Mike and Eric said they have views and have supported political candidates all over the political spectrum.

“We have to be able to laugh about it, and laugh at yourself and your own political views,” Mike said. “You can’t believe that what you think is not funny to other people or vice versa… Everyone needs money to pay their bills, and that ends up informing their politics on certain issues. But people have more in common at the end of the day than they realize, I think.”

Jackman is one of the first to admit that he doesn’t purely love or hate Trump.

“I’m not 100 percent a Trump basher,” Jackman said. “I do like what’s happening with North Korea, I think that’s awesome. You aren’t going to have an instant solution to over 70 years of conflict and war… Just to see the leaders of North and South Korea holding hands crossing the border – that’s Trump man, he made that happen.”

Jackman said he also enjoys that Trump has opened more dialogue between the United States and Russia.

“He’s brash and he’s nasty, but when you are at that level on the world’s stage it’s a nasty, ugly game,” Jackman said. “I have to give him credit for those two things. I don’t want nuclear war, I don’t think anyone does.”

In many ways, the Jackmans view the upcoming Boston show as an audition for bigger and greater things.

The twins will be recording the show, in an attempt to shop the performance to other performance venues with the hopes of turning it into a regionally or nationally touring show. Beyond that, Eric said the pinnacle of his Trump impersonation would be to perform it on late night television or Joe Rogan’s podcast “The Joe Rogan Experience.”

“I’m along for the ride. I don’t know how long I’m going to be on earth, I’m just going to enjoy it,” Jackman said. “… People appreciate it, we all like to laugh. We are all wound up all week with our jobs, life, and the grind, so the comedy and the impressions is a nice escape from that.”

Tickets for “President Trump’s State of Disunion” are $15 to $20 and available at jackmantrump.com and therockwell.org. The show is 21+ and features nationally touring comedian Bob Phillips.


Comedian Eric Jackman, pictured in his Peterborough kitchen, plans to take his Trump shtick to the Boston area next month to headline a comedy show. Staff photo by Nicholas Handy— Comedian Eric Jackman, pictured in his Peterborough kitchen, plans to take his Trump shtick to the Boston area next month to headline a comedy show. - Staff photo by Nicholas Handy—