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Mason man fulfills mission to climb highest peaks in United States

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Courtesy photo—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Courtesy photo—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Courtesy photo—

  • Mike Bromberg of Mason is the first person on record to climb the 200 highest peaks in the contiguous United States. Courtesy photo—



Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Thursday, October 05, 2017

When Mike Bromberg sets out to climb a mountain, the trail to the top starts long before he ever straps on a pack.

“The journey is part of the destination,” said the Mason man, a “semi-retired” electronic design engineer. “I love being able to figure something out. I love planning, executing and completing. All of that stuff is part of my engineering mentality, checking things off, completing things.”

In August, Bromberg checked off a huge entry on his to-do list, as he became the first person on record to summit each of the 200 highest mountains in the contiguous United States. And he did so in style, climbing Wyoming’s 13,475-foot Mount Fremont in August to complete the checklist during the solar eclipse.

“The plan was to get the peak, to finish the list, to get the record, to be the first one to do the list and to see the eclipse at the same time,” Bromberg said. “Major earthy, crunchy outing in the wilderness.”

Bromberg and his crew of MIT fraternity brothers reached the summit of Mount Fremont shortly before the eclipse reached totality, creating an eerie scene.

“Totality was incredible,” Bromberg said. “It really was dark. And we really did see the flaring corona. It got cold, and we felt it getting cold. The lack of the sun was perceptibly, palpably colder.”

Peakbagging exploits aside, Bromberg said his lifetime of hiking has contributed to his good health.

“It’s kept me healthy,” he said. “I’m 68 years old and I don’t have a ‘smitwitifis.’ How many 68-year-olds do you know that don’t have a ‘smitwitifis?’ Now you ask, what’s a ‘smitwitifis?’ It’s a pill box that says S-M-T-W-T-F-S with pills that you have to take every day. But I don’t have to take pills every day, because climbing mountains – and smoking marijuana – has kept my blood pressure and my blood cholesterol and my blood sugar under control.”