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Peterborough

Mariposa Museum series begins this Wednesday

In its sixth year, Mariposa Afternoons will again offer experiences that are both stimulating and fun designed to particularly accommodate the “afternoon crowd.” All of the presentations are part of the Mariposa’s current exhibition Sharing Sacred Ground: Weaving memory and Change in the Americas.

April 9 at 2 p.m. the first of the Mariposa Afternoons begins with Prayer Arrows—The Creation of a Votive Offering. Terry Reeves, Education Director at the Mariposa and fabric artist, Pashya White will give a brief overview of the significance of prayer arrows and other votive offerings from around the world and assist members of the audience in creating an arrow of their own.

For the second program on April 23, Made of Thunder, Made of Glass—American Indian Beadwork of the Northeast, artist and writer Gerry Biron will share examples of beadwork and examine the historical context and currents that contributed to the emergence of “souvenir” beadwork produced in the 19th century by the Northeast woodland tribes.

On May 7, in her presentation Tapestry Traditions, artist and educator Connie Gray will talk about the particular technique used to create tapestry weavings from basic concept to intricate design. She will refer to the tapestry art of Mary Merrill now on display at the Mariposa and other historic masterpieces.

For the final presentation of the series on May 21, 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State, Robert Goodby Associate Professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University will describe how the depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological site was unearthed in Keene, which dated back to the end of the Ice Age.

All Mariposa Afternoon programs begin at 2 p.m. and end with refreshments. Admission to each is $5, members free except for Made of Thunder Made of Glass and 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State, which are free to everyone, thanks to generous grants from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.

Mariposa is wheelchair accessible.

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