M/cloudy
48°
M/cloudy
Hi 54° | Lo 29°

Peterborough

SACRED SCENES

MARIPOSA MUSEUM: ‘Exile and Pilgrimage’

  • Arpilleras from Peru show the daily life of women in the shantytowns of Lima, Peru.

    Arpilleras from Peru show the daily life of women in the shantytowns of Lima, Peru.

  • Hmong story cloths show scenes of Hmong culture and daily life. The tradition was started after women began stitching traditional Hmong illustrations drawn by Hmong men while in refugee camps in Thailand.

    Hmong story cloths show scenes of Hmong culture and daily life. The tradition was started after women began stitching traditional Hmong illustrations drawn by Hmong men while in refugee camps in Thailand.

  • Paper relief art from Giles Laroche, from his book "Sacred Places," shos the Shri Meenaskshi Amman Temple in India.

    Paper relief art from Giles Laroche, from his book "Sacred Places," shos the Shri Meenaskshi Amman Temple in India.

  • A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.

    A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.

  • Paper relief artwork by Giles Laroche shows the City of Toledo and the Castilla La Mancha in Spain.

    Paper relief artwork by Giles Laroche shows the City of Toledo and the Castilla La Mancha in Spain.

  • A Hmong story cloth shows various scenes of people working on a farm.

    A Hmong story cloth shows various scenes of people working on a farm.

  • Part IV of the Mariposa Museum's Sacred Geography Exhibit began this month, with textiles from Peru and the Hmong culture, shown above, and paper relief art from Giles Laroche.

    Part IV of the Mariposa Museum's Sacred Geography Exhibit began this month, with textiles from Peru and the Hmong culture, shown above, and paper relief art from Giles Laroche.

  • A paper relief depiction of the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey, is part of the Mariposa Museum's current "Sacred Geography" exhibit

    A paper relief depiction of the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey, is part of the Mariposa Museum's current "Sacred Geography" exhibit

  • An arpillera showing a "pelea de gallos" or cock fight, is on display at the Mariposa Museum, along with other arpilleras, a type of three-dimensional textile from Peru.

    An arpillera showing a "pelea de gallos" or cock fight, is on display at the Mariposa Museum, along with other arpilleras, a type of three-dimensional textile from Peru.

  • A brightly colored aprillera from Peru shows women gathered around a fruit tree.

    A brightly colored aprillera from Peru shows women gathered around a fruit tree.

  • A Peruvian Arpillera shows women haggling for goods at an open-air market.

    A Peruvian Arpillera shows women haggling for goods at an open-air market.

  • A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.

    A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.

  • Arpilleras from Peru show the daily life of women in the shantytowns of Lima, Peru.
  • Hmong story cloths show scenes of Hmong culture and daily life. The tradition was started after women began stitching traditional Hmong illustrations drawn by Hmong men while in refugee camps in Thailand.
  • Paper relief art from Giles Laroche, from his book "Sacred Places," shos the Shri Meenaskshi Amman Temple in India.
  • A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.
  • Paper relief artwork by Giles Laroche shows the City of Toledo and the Castilla La Mancha in Spain.
  • A Hmong story cloth shows various scenes of people working on a farm.
  • Part IV of the Mariposa Museum's Sacred Geography Exhibit began this month, with textiles from Peru and the Hmong culture, shown above, and paper relief art from Giles Laroche.
  • A paper relief depiction of the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey, is part of the Mariposa Museum's current "Sacred Geography" exhibit
  • An arpillera showing a "pelea de gallos" or cock fight, is on display at the Mariposa Museum, along with other arpilleras, a type of three-dimensional textile from Peru.
  • A brightly colored aprillera from Peru shows women gathered around a fruit tree.
  • A Peruvian Arpillera shows women haggling for goods at an open-air market.
  • A paper relief shows the Sakyamuni Pagoda, a Buddhist Palace Monastery in China. The Sakyamuni Pagoda is one of the few existing wooden pagoda in the world, and the tallest.

The Mariposa Museum in Peterborough is featuring the illustrations of Giles Laroche through January, as part of its ongoing exhibit “Sacred Geography: Many Cultures, One Earth,” which has been at the Mariposa since March 2013. And textiles help illustrate “Exile and Pilgrimage” in a new phase of “Sacred Geography.”

Laroche, a children’s book illustrator from Salem, has multiple paper relief works in the exhibit, detailing scenes of sacred places from around the world, from an Alaskan church to Castilla La Mancha in Toledo, Spain, and Buddha’s Palace in the Shanzi Province, China. Many of the works are illustrations from Laroche’s book, “Sacred Places.” His works are for sale and are on display through Jan. 31.

The Mariposa is also honoring textile works as part of the “Exile and Pilgrimage” chapter of the Sacred Geography exhibit. The depict the daily lives of cultures in South America and Asia. Along the stairs of the Mariposa hang arpilleras, or detailed hand-sewn, three-dimensional textiles. They show the lives of women in the shanty towns of Lima, Peru. Arpilleras originated in Chile, where women political prisoners under the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship, from the mid-70s to the early 1990s, used them to send secret messages to the outside. Now, they are an essential income for many families.

Also on the walls are Hmong story cloths. Like the arpilleras, the story cloths often show scenes of daily life, this time among the Hmong culture, which is made up of people from Southern China, Burma and Laos. Women in the culture often learn early how to make the textiles, which use applique, reverse applique, embroidery and batik. Story cloths were first made after the Hmong people fled Laos and were kept in refugee camps in Thailand after 1975 when Marxist Pathet Lao and the Vietnamese Army took over the Laotian government. The women would stitch story cloths from illustrations made by the men as a way to remember their culture, with life before and after fleeing Laos an over-arching theme.

For more information, visit mariposamuseum.org.

There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.