P/sunny
40°
P/sunny
Hi 66° | Lo 36°

Still pushing limits, just not quite so hard

  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

    Bob Fogg

    (Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

    Bob Fogg

    (Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

    Bob Fogg

    (Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

    Bob Fogg

    (Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)
  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)
  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)
  • Bob Fogg<br/><br/>(Staff photo by Dave Anderson)

Bob Fogg’s a member of the 5:30 crazies. He walks into the Bond Wellness Center at Monadnock Community Hospital in Peterborough every weekday morning as soon as the doors open, ready to work out for an hour and a half.

“My routine’s very flexible,” says the 74-year-old Fogg, who lives in Hancock. “I stretch on the mats, do upper body work on three or four different machines. Sometimes I do leg work. I always finish with 20 minutes to a half hour of aerobic exercise, on the treadmill or the arc trainer or the stair climber. But the biggest thing is, I get out there and talk.”

Fogg retired from running the Hancock Service Station about 18 years ago, but he still keeps active doing odd jobs around town, including regularly winding the town’s clock, a job he’s done since 1965. He also helps coach the cross country team at South Meadow School, trying to pass on advice he learned from his years as an active runner.

Fogg says he was never an athlete, but took up running in the 1960s after reading Dr. Kenneth Cooper’s book “Aerobics.”

“When I was working, I didn’t get a good workout,” he says. “The running kept me physically fit.”

But he admits he really didn’t know how to run and Cooper’s book didn’t say much about stretching or warming up or equipment.

“I used to get shin splints, and I just thought that was the price of running – no pain, no gain. Then one day a woman looked at my sneakers and gave me the best advice, to get some real running shoes. I bought a pair of Nike Road Runners; they were about $15. It was like running on a cloud. The most important thing you can do is to get something good on your feet.”

Fogg doesn’t run any more because he has a slightly displaced vertebra in his lower back.

Instead he used the cardiovascular equipment at the Wellness Center, which puts less stress on his back and feet.

“I don’t push myself as hard as a used to, but even if I don’t have a good workout, I still feel good,” he says. “I’m sort of addicted to my exercise. If I miss a day, I feel guilty. My goal is to be around as long as I have a good quality of life. I ain’t ready to pack it in.”

— By Dave Anderson

There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.